School News

News for Marion Community Schools


Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News By Myla Townsend

Congratulations to Marion High School Principal Keith Burke for being selected as the Indiana Association of School Principals High School Principal of the Year for District 6. District 6 includes Grant, Delaware, Henry, Wayne, Randolph, Jay and Blackford County.

IASP annually recognizes outstanding school leaders in each of 12 Indiana districts who have demonstrated excellence in leadership at the building level, district level, and community level, as well as the state level. These principals are acknowledged by their peers for exemplary contributions they have made to the profession. IASP will hold a conference this fall where all honorees are invited to attend, and a state principal of the year will be named.

“It’s always nice to be recognized for your accomplishments and also by your peers,” Burke told the Chronicle-Tribune. “(But) I think individual awards are a little overrated. I’m really excited and truly honored, but it’s as much an award for the school as for the principal.”

Keith Burke has worked over two decades in various Indiana public schools. He has received multiple awards including National Community School Principal of the year in 2006 while he was working at IPS Washington High School.

Since Keith Burke joined Marion High School in 2015, he has had outstanding success and commitment to Marion Community Schools. Marion Community Schools thanks Mr. Burke for his work and congratulates Mr. him on this GIANT achievement!
Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News A Marion High School student recently earned a national award in the annual Scholastic Art and Writing competition.

Hailey Teeguarden, an MHS senior, earned a Silver Award in the drawing / illustration category at national level competition for her portrait, "Halsey", seen below.

She earned a Gold Key for this piece at the regional Scholastic Art and Writing Awards at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, the highest honor given, and an automatic entry at the national level.

Congratulations to Hailey on this outstanding national honor!

She also earned an Honorable Mention in the same category for her work "Downeaster Alexa".
 


 

Five other Marion High School students also earned the highest regional honors for their artwork submitted to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, and their works will continue on to national-level competition. Two other students were also recognized for their outstanding work.
 

Emily Phillippe, MHS junior, earned a Gold Key for her digital art work titled "Side-Tracked", seen below. She also earned Silver Keys for her digital art work titled "Connected", and for her paintings titled "Guardian", "Joyful", "Hardware", and "Calm Waters"; and Honorable Mentions for her digital art work titled "Glowing", her paintings titled "Great Kiskadee", "Cadillac Mountain", "Sunflower", and "Silent Tears", and her photography "Seeing Double" and "Seeing Through Me". 


 



Logan Carrico, an MHS junior, earned a Gold Key award for his photography titled "Jonathan", seen below. He also earned three Silver Keys for his pieces titled "Isak", "An Empty Room", and "Anna", along with an Honorable Mention for his work "Camille".



 


 

Sianna Hobbs, MHS sophomore, earned a Gold Key in the drawing and illustration category for her piece titled "Avery", seen below. She also earned a Silver Key for her mixed media piece "Queen of Hearts", and an Honorable Mention for her drawing / illustration piece titled "Fame".





Kira Humes, MHS junior, earned a Gold Key for in the drawing and illustration category for her piece titled "This is Melodrama", seen below. and Honorable Mentions in the same category for her pieces "Thorns and Stings", "Living in the Blue", "Dawn", and "At A Glance".

 


 


Lauren Morrow, MHS senior, earned a Gold Key for her sculpture titled "Forever in Stone", seen below.


 

Additional awards: 
 

  • Sophia Porter, MHS senior, earned a Silver Key in the ceramics and glass category for her piece titled "Koi Pond" and an Honorable Mention in the same category for her piece "Roulette".
  • Emma Waterman, a sophomore in the CSA Arts Academy, a partnership with MHS, earned a Silver Key in the ceramics and glass category for her work "Winter's Dream: A Primitive Trio".
  • Bayley Grieve, MHS sophomore, earned Honorable Mentions for her paintings titled "Longing", "Turgoise Waters", and "Thinking Through the Sleep".

 

The Fort Wayne Museum of Art's scholastic competition involves 52 counties in northeast Indiana and northwest Ohio, and all art works will be on display at the museum, 311 E. Main St., Fort Wayne, from Feb. 9 through April 6. For museum hours, admission fees and directions, click here to visit the museum’s website.

According to the FWMoA website, the high caliber of entries into the Fort Wayne competition has propelled the region to be one of the top regions for national awards given in the past few years. This is the fifth year in the last six that Marion High School students have earned top awards in the competition. MHS students earned honors in 2013, in 2014, in 2016, in 2017, and in 2018

Congratulations to all of these students and to their outstanding teachers, Tashema Davis and Nate Larson. We are proud of you!


 
Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News Marion Community Schools is pleased to announce the 2019 inductees to the Marion High School Hall of Distinction.

The selection committee chose seven inductees:
  • Max R. Long, M.D., Marion High School Class of 1933, World War II veteran, serving with the U.S. Marines, and earning two Silver Stars and the Navy Cross, for his work evacuating the beaches at Iwo Jima and Saipan. He returned to Marion after the war and practiced medicine here for nearly 50 years, including serving as the Marion Community Schools physician for 32 years. (Inducted posthumously.)
  • John F. Boxell, M.D., Marion High School Class of 1957, otolaryngologist / head and neck surgeon who practiced in Chattanooga, Tenn., for more than 35 years, and professor at University of Tennessee College of Medicine; also provided free clinic and surgical services for underserved and uninsured populations.
  • Paul Usher, Marion High School Class of 1963, past president and CEO of Marion General Hospital for eight years, after 20 years as CFO, and six years prior to that in financial services, retiring in 2016; during his tenure leading MHG, the hospital experienced significant growth, in a time when many other smaller community hospitals were begin bought out by conglomerates, and solidified itself as an important community partner through philanthropic giving.
  • David Colescott, Marion High School Class of 1976, an inspiring and determined leader on the basketball court for the Giants, then at University of North Carolina, and then in the business world, serving as VP of Sales and Chief Customer Officer for Hanes Brands Inc.
  • Troy Bentley Overton, Marion High School Class of 1980, West Point graduate; U.S. Army aviator, and judge advocate general who provided legal services to troops in Afghanistan; deputy attorney general of California. (Inducted posthumously.)
  • Tonya (Riddle) Cornett, Marion High School Class of 1987, innovator brewmaster, first woman to win the title of Small Brewpub Brewmaster of the Year at the World Beer Cup (2008), the world’s largest commercial beer competition, brewmaster at Bend Bewing Co. in Oregon for 10 years, now head of research and development at 10 Barrel Brewing.
  • Bobbie Owensby, honorary inductee, Marion High School social studies teacher for decades; sponsor of Black History Club which has expanded horizons for more than one generation of students with its spring break HBCU trips, annual plays, and more; respected and beloved community leader.
The 2019 inductees will be honored at an induction ceremony and banquet set for 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, 2019, at the Henry West Banquet Room, Barnes Student Center, Indiana Wesleyan University, part of Marion Giants homecoming weekend. Ticket information will be provided closer to the date of the event. Inductees will also be honored at the Giants’ homecoming football game on Friday, Sept. 13.

The MHS Hall of Distinction gives lasting recognition to alumni who have made exceptional contributions to the achievements and prestige of Marion Community Schools. It also serves to help inspire current students to aspire to similar success.

Any MHS alumnus who graduated at least five years ago and who has made substantial contributions to the achievements of Marion Community Schools or whose exemplary actions reflect honor on MCS is eligible for nomination. The Hall seeks to honor men and women who have distinguished themselves through superb accomplishment on a local, state or national level in diverse fields of endeavor.

Non-MHS graduates may be afforded honorary status in the MHS Hall of Distinction.

The nomination period will be reopened next year. For more information, including nomination forms and details on previous inductees, click here.
Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News The Spirit Store at Marion High School has new store hours.

The Spirit Store, located across the hall from the main office, inside Door 1 on the 26th Street side of the building, will be staffed on Monday and Wednesday from 8:15 to 9 a.m. and Friday from 4 to 5 p.m.

In addition, the Spirit Store can be open any time Monday through Friday on request during the hours of 8 to 11 a. m. and 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. for your shopping convenience. (Come to the main office to request entry).

Please stop by and check out the new apparel that has arrived!
Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News Select Marion Community Schools students in grades kindergarten through eight will be participating next month in Unified Game Day, a Special Olympics-style friendly competition in a variety of unified track and field events.

Unified Game Day will be hosted by the Grant County Special Education Cooperative, of which Marion Community Schools is a member. The event will be at Taylor University from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 10. The day will begin with an opening ceremony, and student competition is set to begin at 10 a.m. Parents, school supporters, and community members are invited to cheer on our young athletes!



More information, provided by GCSEC:

Grant County Special Education Co-op and Taylor University are working together this school year to engage students in activities designed to promote school communities where young people are agents of change — fostering respect, dignity, and advocacy for people with intellectual disabilities. Through this program, known as Unified Champion Schools, children of all abilities are provided opportunities to develop self-confidence and social skills while learning the fundamentals necessary for future participation in Unified Sports training and competition.

Grant County Special Education Co-op is among hundreds of preschools, elementary, middle, and high schools across the state to embrace Special Olympics’ innovative approach to improving social inclusion while simultaneously developing motor skills through curricula which aligns with Indiana State educational standards.

The annual culmination of all Unified Champion Schools programs is one or more Unified Game Day, held each spring and featuring a Special Olympics-style competition in a variety of unified track and field events. Grant County Special Education Co-op will host its Game Day May 10, 2019 at Taylor University this year. From 10am through 2pm students will be engaged in highly competitive events with their age appropriate peers. Various levels of “heats” have been created to ensure student athletes are participating with others who have a similar skill set. 

“Indiana has been recognized as a national leader in the realm of Special Olympics’ Unified Sports and social inclusion initiatives, and it’s thanks in large part to the support of faculty, administrators, and students in hundreds of schools throughout the state,” said Special Olympics Indiana President and CEO Jeff Mohler. “The Special Olympics movement is still about sports — but it’s also about changing the way the world sees people with intellectual disabilities by targeting younger generations through programs like Unified Champion Schools.”

According to Lisa Graham, Executive Director of the Grant County Special Education Co-op, this event was so successful last year with all five districts in the county participating. Our county, with each of the 5 districts competing together, operates much like an athletic tournament or Grant Four-type competition. It has all of the components that make athletics a reason to participate: sportsmanship, teamwork, competitiveness, high energy, friendship and thrilling outcomes!

Hundreds of athletes from Grant County in grades Pre-K through 8th are expected to participate in this year’s event. The preschool students will be competing at their local schools while the older students will be together on May 10th at the George Glass Track and Field Complex. The day will begin at 9:30 a.m. with community, parents and school supporters invited. Beginning with an opening ceremony featuring a Law Enforcement Torch Run by officers from the University Police Department and firemen from the Upland Volunteer Fire Department, each district will parade around the track to start the festivities and open up the day’s competition.

Special Olympics Indiana’s Unified Champion Schools initiatives are supported in part by the Indiana Council of Administrators of Special Education (ICASE), the Indiana Middle Level Education Association (IMLEA), and — through a partnership known as Champions Together — the Indiana High School Athletic Association (IHSAA).

Click here to learn more about Unified Champion Schools. For more information about the implementation of these programs in Indiana schools, contact state Director of Unified Champion Schools Mark Booth at mbooth@soindiana.org.

ABOUT SPECIAL OLYMPICS INDIANA
Special Olympics Indiana is a not-for-profit organization that provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in more than 20 Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, reaching more than 14,000 athletes across Indiana. The organization receives no federal or state appropriated funds, is not a United Way agency, and relies entirely on corporate, civic and individual donations.  For more information about Special Olympics Indiana, call (317) 328-2000 or visit www.soindiana.org.

ABOUT UNIFIED CHAMPION SCHOOLS
Special Olympics’ Unified Champion Schools program is defined as a pre-school, primary school, secondary school, college, or university offering Unified Sports® opportunities to its students across the world. Unified Champion Schools programming is designed to facilitate Special Olympics Unified Sports®, provide classroom and community experiences that reduce bullying and exclusion, promote healthy activities, combat stereotypes and negative attitudes, eliminate hurtful language in schools, and engage young people in activities that lead to improved behavior and school climate.

For more information about Grant County Special Education Cooperative, contact Lisa Graham, Director, at lisa_graham@olemiss.k12.in.us or 765-677-4456